Lund wins Whiteman AFB Chiefs Choice award

Senior Airman Dillon Lund, a low observable journeyman with the 509th Maintenance Squadron poses for a group photo after receiving the Chief’s Choice Award for February 2019.

Senior Airman Dillon Lund, a low observable journeyman with the 509th Maintenance Squadron poses for a group photo after receiving the Chief’s Choice Award for February 2019 on March 21, 2019, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. The Chiefs Group recognized Lund for his contributions on and off duty along with his response to a rollover accident near Columbia, Missouri. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Parker J. McCauley)

Senior Airman Dillon Lund holds up his Chief’s Choice Award and challenge coin on March 21, 2019.

Senior Airman Dillon Lund, a low observable journeyman with the 509th Maintenance Squadron holds up his Chief’s Choice Award and challenge coin on March 21, 2019, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. Chief Master Sgt. Thomas Fisher, the LO flight superintendent with the 509th MXS, presented Lund the Award on behalf of the Chiefs Group after Lund finished his shift. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Airman Parker J. McCauley)

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. --

A low observable journeyman with the 509th Maintenance Squadron won the Chief’s Choice Award for February 2019 on March 21, 2019, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

The Whiteman AFB Chiefs Group recognized Senior Airman Dillon Lund by for his contributions on and off duty.

Chief Master Sgt. Thomas Fisher, the LO flight superintendent with the 509th MXS, highlighted Lund’s work.

“Senior Airman Lund is a Low Observable Technician assigned to the 509th MXS,” said Fisher. “He is a key member of the tailpipe shop and his proficiency performing what is essentially depot-level maintenance tasks on aircraft engine sub-assemblies has helped the wing achieve historic B-2 spare engine levels.

Fisher also spoke about Lund’s contributions outside of the LO shop.

“His efforts have helped the 442nd graduate 100 percent of its trainees in the past two years, well above averages across Air Force Reserve units,” said Fisher.

Fisher also said Lund was instrumental in providing aid during a rollover crash outside Columbia, Missouri.

“He assisted the member in exiting the vehicle and helped stabilize a broken limb while redirecting traffic around the scene,” he said.

 

Lund participated in a Q&A session to discuss his accomplishment:

 

How does it feel being recognized with this award?

I feel honored to be chosen for this award, and it brings a sense of pride to myself.

 

Can you please explain what you do during your normal duty days and how that contributed to the award?

On a normal duty day in the Tailpipe shop, we inspect the damage on the inside of a B-2 exhaust. When the damage is determined to be out of the limits it is removed from the aircraft and brought to us for intensive repair using specifically tailored radar materials and chemicals.  These materials not only restore the inside of the aircraft exhaust but can also be incorporated to high heat areas resulting from the jet engine.  All composite and metal repairs are in an effort to maintain the B-2 Spirit mechanical and heat absorption requirements.

 

What does your volunteering with the 442d Fighter Wing entail?

Volunteering for the 442d Fighter Wing entails training future Airmen on the next step of their Air Force career which is Basic Training. We teach them memory work, drill and ceremony, and how to deal with the stressors they will deal with at basic training.

 

What makes you want to mentor trainees?

Being able to have a hand in shaping the future Airmen of the Air Force and seeing their success is the reason that I keep going back to volunteer at the 442d Fighter Wing.

 

Can you please describe the story of how you responded to the rollover accident near Columbia, Missouri?

I was coming back from Columbia, Missouri when an Army M1083 driving in the westbound lane flipped and went through the center median, and came into the eastbound lane. After coming upon the accident I pulled over and assisted a couple other gentlemen in getting the door open and pulling the injured Soldier out and performing aid to the Soldier. After we got the Soldier stable i directed traffic to help keep the highway from backing up till the highway patrol was able to get ahold of the scene.

 

What was that like?

It was a sight that opened my eyes and made me react to the situation without hesitation.