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Do you have broken equipment laying around the office? Don’t throw it out!

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Lear, an Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group, removes the damaged layers from a circuit board at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, on May 29, 2018. AFREP technicians attend certification courses at David-Monthan AFB, Arizona, to be qualified to perform electronic repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla)

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Christopher Lear, an Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group, removes the damaged layers from a circuit board at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, on May 29, 2018. AFREP technicians attend certification courses at David-Monthan AFB, Arizona, to be qualified to perform electronic repairs. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Sherrill, an Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group, repairs a burnt power control unit at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, on May 29, 2018. This power control unit is the last available spare in the Air Force, and without repair, some unit could suffer time delays. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Sherrill, an Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group, repairs a burnt power control unit at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, on May 29, 2018. This power control unit is the last available spare in the Air Force, and without repair, some unit could suffer time delays. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Sherrill, an Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group, cleans a damaged circuit board from a power control unit on May 29, 2018. It is worth $70,000 and is part of the munition lift trailer at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. This type of repair can take from 24 hours to two weeks, depending on the level of damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla)

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Sherrill, an Air Force Repair Enhancement Program technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group, cleans a damaged circuit board from a power control unit on May 29, 2018. It is worth $70,000 and is part of the munition lift trailer at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri. This type of repair can take from 24 hours to two weeks, depending on the level of damage. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Danielle Quilla)

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. -- The Air Force strives to make every dollar count. The high cost of replacing devices is a large portion of installations’ annual budget so Airmen are encouraged to repair broken items, rather than tossing and replacing them.

That’s precisely what the Air Force Repair Enhancement Program (AFREP) does.

The AFREP section at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, has three certified technicians dedicated to repairing broken equipment, ranging from basic office equipment to parts for the A-10 Thunderbolt II. This reduces unnecessary expenses and minimizes waste.

“We would like to let Team Whiteman come see us,” said Tech. Sgt. Benjamin Sherrill, an AFREP technician assigned to the 509th Maintenance Group. “We are looking to offer our expertise to the entire installation to repair miscellaneous items that have been stored away and forgotten because they’re broken.”

Sherrill and his fellow AFREP technicians, Master Sgt. Daniel Nelson and Staff Sgt. Christopher Lear, are certified to fix just about anything a customer turns into their section. Their efforts have already saved the 509th Bomb Wing more than $842,000 in repairs for the 2018 fiscal year.

“Within the last fiscal year, we replaced a $5 fuse on the $27,000 microwave for the B-2 sustenance container, returning it back to service,” Sherrill said. “Many times it only takes a few dollars to get a piece of equipment restored to its fully functional state.”

Before throwing away that faulty keyboard or any other equipment, contact AFREP or go to Building 709, Room 107.

“Just ask us,” Sherrill said. “The worst thing that we might say is we can’t fix it, but we will do all the necessary research before coming to that conclusion.”

For more information, email AFREP at 509MSG.MXQG.AFREP@us.af.mil or call the technicians at 660-687-6886 / 6890.