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Set for CBRN threats

CBRN training at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

Airmen fit their gas masks during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills class March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The class ensures Airmen have a full understanding of the CBRN threats, threat levels and mission-oriented protective posture gear. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer)

CBRN training at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Hector Ybanez, the 509th Munitions Squadron armament maintenance section chief, inspects his gas mask during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills class March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. During the class Airmen are trained on how to properly inspect and wear the mission-oriented protective gear that can help save their life in the event of a CBRN attack. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer)

CBRN training at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Kenneth Baker, an emergency management team member assigned to the 509th Logistics Readiness Squadron, leads a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills class March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The class familiarized Airmen on the various CBRN threats, contaminants, and how to inspect and wear the MOPP gear. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer)

CBRN training at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Nicholas Walters, an aircraft electrical and environmental specialist assigned to the 509th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, inspects a piece of the mission-oriented protective gear during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills class March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The class familiarized Airmen on the various CBRN threats, contaminants, and how to inspect and wear the MOPP gear. Airmen are required to complete the class every 18 months to ensure they know what to do in the event of a CBRN attack. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer)

CBRN training at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

Mission-oriented protective posture gear is set out during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills class March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The MOPP gear consists of a mask, body armor, helmet, web belt, trousers, jacket, gloves and boots. The class focuses on how to inspect and wear the MOPP gear correctly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer)

CBRN training at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.

Airmen go through a buddy check during a Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills class March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. The buddy check is implemented to ensure Airmen check that their wingmen are wearing the mission-oriented protective gear correctly. In the event of a CBRN attack, it is essential the MOPP gear is worn properly. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Taylor Phifer)

WHITEMAN AIR FORCE BASE, Mo. -- Every 18 months Airmen must complete Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Survival Skills training to ensure they know what to do in the event of a threat.

A CBRN Defense Survival Skills class was held on March 5, 2018, at Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri, to prepare Airmen for the possibility of a CBRN attack.

“The purpose of the training is to instruct personnel on how to properly inspect and wear the mission-oriented protective posture gear while also instructing them on how to operate in a contaminated environment,” said U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Brent Wood, the emergency management NCO in charge, assigned to the 509th Civil Engineering Squadron.

The hands-on class focuses on how to inspect and wear the MOPP gear and ensures Airmen can successfully put it on in the recommended time. The gear consists of a mask, body armor, helmet, web belt, trousers, jacket, gloves and boots. Each MOPP level is made up of a different combination of the gear that’s worn.

Before completing the hands-on training, Airmen must pass the computer based training that reviews different types of CBRN threats, threat levels, different MOPP levels and what to do to protect yourself.

“Due to the ever evolving, asymmetric battlefield that our military forces deploy to, it is vital that all personnel become familiar with how to protect themselves,” said Wood.

Along with learning about the MOPP gear, the class familiarizes Airmen on the various CBRN threats and how to identify if a contamination is present in the area or on a person.

“Prior understanding of the CBRN threats and contaminants are important due to the extent of damage that a person could suffer if exposed to a dangerous agent,” said Wood. “This class helps to ensure Airmen are set to protect themselves against any potential CBRN threat.”