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Electrofishing: balancing out the ecosystem

Members of the 509th Civil Engineer Squadron and Missouri Department of Conservation prepare to inspect fish samples they collected from Ike Skelton Lake using electrofishing at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 21, 2016. Electrofishing uses two electrodes, a cathode and an anode, which draw the fish closer to the boat, making it easier for them to be caught by a net. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Danielle Quilla)

Members of the 509th Civil Engineer Squadron and Missouri Department of Conservation prepare to inspect fish samples they collected from Ike Skelton Lake using electrofishing at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 21, 2016. Electrofishing uses two electrodes, a cathode and an anode, which draw the fish closer to the boat, making it easier for them to be caught by a net. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Danielle Quilla)

Keith Donaldson, left, a natural resource manager assigned to the 509th Civil Engineer Squadron, and Ty Cravens, right, a resource assistant with the Missouri Department of Conservation, collect fish from Ike Skelton Lake at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 21, 2016. From the data they collected, the team determined which fish needed to be added to the lake to balance out the ecosystem. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Danielle Quilla)

Keith Donaldson, left, a natural resource manager assigned to the 509th Civil Engineer Squadron, and Ty Cravens, right, a resource assistant with the Missouri Department of Conservation, collect fish from Ike Skelton Lake at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 21, 2016. From the data they collected, the team determined which fish needed to be added to the lake to balance out the ecosystem. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Danielle Quilla)

Trish Yasger, left, a fisheries biologist with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), and Ty Cravens, right, a resource assistant with MDC, inspect a fish from the Ike Skelton Lake at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 21, 2016. The team used electrofishing, which is a scientific survey method designed to sample fish populations to determine abundance, density and species composition. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Danielle Quilla)

Trish Yasger, left, a fisheries biologist with the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), and Ty Cravens, right, a resource assistant with MDC, inspect a fish from the Ike Skelton Lake at Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo., June 21, 2016. The team used electrofishing, which is a scientific survey method designed to sample fish populations to determine abundance, density and species composition. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Danielle Quilla)